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The need is Constant.


The gratification is instant.

Give blood.

OryCon 33
Blood Drive

Saturday, November 12, 2011
10:00am-3:00pm

To schedule your appointment, or for more information, 
contact American Red Cross (503) 528-5603 
or go online to www.redcrossblood.org; sponsor code: OryCon

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Countdown for Orycon 33

Open Read & Critique

An Open Read & Critique (ORC) is an opportunity to read the opening portion of your short story or novel aloud to your peers. They will then critique your work Clarion-style, in round-table marathon sessions, focusing on your first 750 words. Our theme is "How to Hook a Reader."

ORC Rules:

  1. Each author reads the first 750 words of their work. This is approximately three double-spaced manuscript pages. We will enforce a ten-minute time limit for each reading.
  2. The material read must be appropriate for a PG-13 audience. No explicit sex, graphic violence, or excessive profanity.
  3. Each attendee has up to five minutes to critique the work.
  4. Critiques must be directed to the art and craft of the work read, and not toward the content, the author personally, or critiques by others.
  5. Errors in grammar, usage, etc., should be written in notes, not given orally.
  6. Only one person may speak at a time. No interruptions, please!
  7. Authors may only respond to questions or comments after all critiques are finished.
  8. Authors may not explain their work in advance or defend it against critiques. If an explanation is necessary, the writing needs more work!
  9. Session leaders may revise these rules as necessary.

ORC Frequently Asked Questions

What is an ORC?

ORC stands for "Open Read & Critique."

This is an opportunity to receive peer feedback on a manuscript before sending it out to agents and editors. ORCs can help pinpoint problems with character, structure, and prose, in order to facilitate your ability to market a commercially viable manuscript.

How does an ORC work?

In an Open Read & Critique (ORC), authors read aloud from their material to a group of peers in a relaxed, informal round table setting.

Attendees jot down notes as they listen. After the reading, they give feedback on the piece. We use a model similar to Clarion: a five-minute critique per attendee, and no questions asked of the author--nor any response from the author--until all critiques have been given. Written notes should be given to the author to keep.

We recognize that people will come in and out during the session, but please be fair to others. If you are reading your work, stay long enough to give your critique to a majority of the other authors present.

When and where are Open Read & Critique sessions held?

At OryCon 31, ORCs will run both Friday and Saturday afternoons. Readings are done on a first-come, first-read basis. A sign-up sheet will be posted outside of the designated ORC room each morning.

ORCs are based on "How to Hook a Reader." Authors will read the first 750 words of their work to a round table group. Professional authors and editors may drop in.

Content should be rated PG-13 and contain no explicit sex, graphic violence, or excessive profanity.

What is a "Rogue" Workshop and is it the same as an ORC?

In some parts of the country, ORCs are referred to as "Rogue Workshops." Rogue Workshops are generally held late at night but are run in the same manner as ORCs.

Is there an extra fee for participating in the ORCs?

Nope; just bring your manuscript and something to write on. Come prepared to read a piece of your work, listen to other writers, and critique their work.

Can I attend both ORC sessions?

Absolutely. In fact, we encourage it--writers working toward publication deserve all the critiques they can get!